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Tuesday, May 27, 2014

How Does My Garden Grow?

Recall I started seeds this year in my empty disposable coffee maker cups, you can read about that {here}.

They actually grew and needed to be planted but the weekends were flying by and out the window my vision of a big beautiful garden flew too.

So I went to Pinterest and entered these words..... "Vegetable Container Garden".



Man there were some beauties to pick from!  Sooooooooo many excellent and pretty ideas to pick from.

However Brawn picked the first one he saw since he had the parts needed and before I knew it, the seeds I started were heading for the dirt.

And because he flew to the garage to make these, I have no photos of his version of the Global Bucket.  Google it, or search for it on Pinterest, you'll get the idea.

I only commented that I didn't really want 5 gallon buckets all over the deck - that isn't my idea of a beautiful garden.

Then before I could prioritize our weekend to-do list, I had old flower pots turned into vegetable containers on the deck.

Brawns idea of pretty.


I never get the garden right.  After 30 years of trying you'd think I would have some wonderful tidbits to share of the bounty I reap.

Nope.

I could compile a list of what didn't work for me, but that's not fair because other people have luck with every failed attempt I've had.

Brawn's idea of a garden is the kind he grew up with.... 12 kids go out and hoe a row, plop seeds in, Mother Nature waters it, it grows, kids weed it, kids pick it, mom cooks it.


My mother in law was able to feed her gaggle from her garden, so she obviously knew what she was doing.

With that many mouths to feed, the last thing she cared about was how pretty it looked, she only cared that it produced.

I've tried before and failed to grow stuff in pots.

And now, we are testing this Global Bucket or Earth Bucket method, or at least our version of it.....


I know it involved a drill, and lids from 5 gallon buckets.  

Those little PVC pipes sticking up are where the water goes.  So in the heat of the summer they water themselves as the moisture wicks up.  

Scientific for me, I know.  I got that from reading the directions.

They are not pretty.  Nothing decorative or pin worthy here, only slightly better than five gallon buckets.

They are not the garden of my dreams. 

BUT.... if this method works, I'll be all over it come next spring. 





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28 comments :

  1. I can't wait to see how your pots with pvc pipe work out. I have grown tomatoes in pots but that's the only food crop.

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  2. I hope it works out for you! Weston's garden actually produced real vegetables that we could actually pick and actually eat. I blew my mind. :)

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  3. You always make me laugh - love the photo simulation of Brawn's childhood garden. LOL!!!

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  4. I'm still working Brawn's childhood version garden. In clay! It's brutal and I dream of raised garden beds with cute, twig arbours arching over them. Hope those buckets work for you!

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  5. I think this Global Bucket thing sounds interesting and promising. You must update us later! I'm no green thumb, and evidently the Mr. is only slightly better, but we still try with our old whiskey barrels every year for a few tomatoes and herbs. (And the mystery plants my 8 yr. old sneaks in) I need to investigate some new methods!

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  6. Let me know how this goes, Bliss...I'm intrigued!

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  7. oh i think we have this in common but it was my own mom who could grow anything.

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  8. well look at you!!! I have never seen the pvc pipe idea but it makes sense. Each year we alternate big, small...this year it was bigger than small. I seem to be the only one who will weed the garden so i decide the size. good luck with your bounty!

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  9. Looks like a great idea. I have been doing my veggies in pots the last several years but had not seen the watering method. I will have to try that!

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  10. OH my! What a great idea!!!! I am going to try this for sure. Thanks, Bliss :)

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  11. Yeah, I say leave the pretty gardens to the flowers. Let the vegetables grow however they can. It's what's inside that counts! I've never grown vegetables from seed. Hope this method works for you.

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  12. That's pretty neat. We've only grown herbs and tomatoes in pots. This year we are trying a raised bed, we'll see how that goes.

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  13. Neat idea. Every year Hubs talks about raised beds, but other more necessary maintenance projects come up. And I HATE to weed, so this may work for us too. Next year he'll be retired and I'm hoping for lots of fun projects to put on the blog! Maybe even a little seat to use with those proposed raised beds :)

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  14. I have to say Brawn is very good to have around. It may not be the beauty you wanted but if it works you will be so happy in the end. Here's to your garden working.

    Cynthia

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  15. Lol! I say give it a shot! Sometimes the "not pretty" things are awesome, too. :)
    xo Heidi

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  16. Here in the Ohio Delta we need LESS water and more sun. Decades ago, when I had my first garden as a newly married, I planted 50 tomato plants. Being a "not as smart as I am now" young'un, I thought each plant would yield 1 tomato and I would have at least 50 tomatoes to make sauces and have enough for a few salads. Well, 1 plant yielded FIFTY tomatoes, and the others were pretty prolific also. KMart couldn't stock enough canning jars for me that summer. I gave up farming after that and enjoy eating my neighbor's vegetables now.

    La Verne@hope&salvage

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  17. Well, if it works, then pretty doesn't matter. As you say, next year you can ramp up the design element.

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  18. That is a great idea with the PVC pipe! It gets so horribly hot here, we have to water sometimes twice a day. My father was a very successful gardener, as is one of my sisters. My thumb is brownish green, depending on what I am growing.....Good thing we don't have to survive on what is growing out there, however, roses and Hydrangeas look amazing, not sure we can eat them and stay alive for very long.

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  19. So interesting Bliss! Looks low maintenance which I LOVE! Keep us posted on how this turns out.

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  20. I've never seen this method either, but I'll be waiting to see how it turns out!
    Brenda

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  21. This is amazing!
    I loved what you said -
    'I could compile a list of what didn't work for me, but that's not fair because other people have luck with every failed attempt I've had.-'

    Me too!
    We were separated at birth!

    Gardening, as funky as my methods are, feeds my soul-

    Laura

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  22. Look at you!! Amazing!! I can't even grow an herb!!!~~Angela

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  23. I think this is a great idea. Since it's right on the deck, you can even keep a better eye on it progress and tweak things if needed. I'm so glad you shared this because I might be able to get Ken to make one or two for our teeny-tiny townhouse yard ;)

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  24. I have to plant our tomatoes in pots because the chickens will have them harvested before I can get to them. They do well, I add a lot of egg shells & epsom salts which the plant loves. I know your method will work and you'll be enjoying the bounty come fall.
    Debbie :)

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  25. I picked up a basil plant at the supermarket last week. Plopped it as is into a terracotta pot that is destined for a bit of faux aging. Didn't even replant. And now ... well, I think I may be drowning it in my attempt to keep it alive. Sigh.

    Can't wait to see how your garden grows!

    :) Linda

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  26. I completely suck at gardening. Perhaps I should try this method? Or I'll just come to your house and steal your produce.

    -andi

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  27. I will too. Be all over it I mean. Next spring. I'm with you, I mess up the garden thing every year (since I moved north). It's the late summer that gets me. I wish they would invent perennial vegetables. Or have they? In Oklahoma asparagas were perennials.

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I read every.single.comment. If comments are turned off on a post, it is due to those nasty spammers, so drop me an email instead - just make sure you are not a no-reply blogger.

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